From School Library Journal Gr 9 Up—As a high school junior, Mike thought he knew himself. He is obsessed with garage rock. His favorite weekend pastime is going to parties. His friends are a ragtag bunch of daredevils and misfits he has been hanging out with since grade school. Although he previously dated only girls, he realizes now how that was a smoke screen. In truth, Mike is attracted to guys. How does this new revelation fit in? Goslee's portrayal of this existential crisis is as humorous as it is grounding. All the feelings of disbelief and anxiety that one might expect are delivered in the way only a 16-year-old boy could articulate, profanity and sexual innuendos included. Although this book could be easily accessible to a younger teen, it does feature more mature content, making it more suitable for older teens. Ultimately, this work focuses on a very common experience. Finding out that you don't fully understand yourself is no easy feat. VERDICT Recommended for young adults who enjoy realistic fiction such as Bryan Lee O'Malley's Scott Pilgrim series or books by John Green, Adam Silvera, or John Corey Whaley.—Jaclyn Anderson, Madison County Library System, MS Read more Review Goslee’s portrayal of this existential crisis is as humorous as it is grounding. All the feelings of disbelief and anxiety that one might expect are delivered in the way only a 16-year-old boy could articulate . . . Recommended for young adults who enjoy realistic fiction such as Bryan Lee O’Malley’s “Scott Pilgrim” series or books by John Green, Adam Silvera, or John Corey Whaley.” ―School Library Journal, starred review “Let’s face it, dudes and dudettes: Goslee’s debut is seriously cool . . . The author doesn’t make a single false step. Everything is just right: the tone, the style, the right-on dialogue, the characterization, the apposite amount of angsty drama, the pace of the genuinely sweet-spirited story. Fans of David Levithan’s Boy Meets Boy (2003) and Becky Albertalli’s Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda (2015) won’t be disappointed.” ―Booklist, starred review “Goslee’s Mike is a typical teenage boy, and she captures his voice effortlessly . . . This is a delightful story that many young people need to hear―that it is okay to be different and it is even better to be yourself.” ―VOYA“The third-person narrative moves quickly with plenty of realistic teen banter . . . A humorous account of a teen’s reluctant and awkward journey to acceptance of his emerging bisexuality.” ― Kirkus Reviews“Readers who are sorting through their own questions about their sexuality . . . may hear their heart’s echo in Mike’s conflicting, confusing, humiliating, exhilarating stew of emotional turmoil on the road to acceptance.” ―The Bulletin Read more See all Editorial Reviews

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